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These are all relatively informal and are mainly used in spoken English: 

✅ To be in a catch-22 (In a no-win situation)

- I’m in a bit of a catch-22 – if I marry her I will die and if I don’t, I’ll have to marry Steve! Blin! 

✅ To be in a (tight) corner (in a problem that is difficult to get out of)

- You’ve lied to the boss who is also my wife! Bollocks, you’ve put me in a tight corner here!!! 

✅ To be in a pickle (in a problem that is difficult to get out of: more informal and softer)

- Emmmm, Sorry to tell you Mr Smith but your replacement lung hasn’t arrived yet. We seem to be in a bit of a pickle until someone finds it. 

✅ To be in a mess (In a bad problem that is difficult to get out)

- Our economy is in such a mess. The only way to repair it is by planting some magic beans or praying for a miracle. 

✅ To be in a (tight) spot (soft way of saying you have a dilemma)

- I am in a bit of tight spot here. Two women have asked me to marry them. Ideas anyone? 

✅ To be in a spot of bother (very soft and indirect way of saying you have a dilemma)

- Dad, do you know that Ferrari you bought for me? Well, I’m in a spot of bother at the moment. It’s a little bit destroyed and I need you to come and collect me.

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