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MUST NOT and BE NOT ALLOWED TO
MUST NOT and BE NOT ALLOWED TO can both express an obligation not to do something. Sometimes, they can be used interchangeably without much ...
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Subject - Verb Agreement
Singular and plural is not as easy a concept as it might seem. In some cases, a compound subject consisting of two or more words that are cl...
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THE FUTURE CONTINUOUS (or PROGRESSIVE)
THE FUTURE CONTINUOUS (or PROGRESSIVE) refers to an unfinished action that will be in progress at a specific time in the future. It is forme...
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THE PERFECT INFINITIVE is used with WOULD LIKE/LOVE/PREFER and one or two other verbs to refer to unreal past situations
Our English Club 19 January 2020
THE PERFECT INFINITIVE is used with WOULD LIKE/LOVE/PREFER and one or two other verbs to refer to unreal past situations; things that never ...
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The Perfect Infinitive (have + past participle) can be used with WOULD LIKE/LOVE/HATE/PREFER, etc. to refer to an unreal event in the past.
Our English Club 19 January 2020
The Perfect Infinitive (have + past participle) can be used with WOULD LIKE/LOVE/HATE/PREFER, etc. to refer to an unreal event in the past. ...
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ABSTRACT NOUNS
Our English Club 18 January 2020
ABSTRACT NOUNS denote things that are not concrete. We can think of an abstract noun as being similar to an abstract painting. Both abstract...
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HELP is a verb that can be used with or without 'to'
Our English Club 18 January 2020
HELP is a verb that can be used with or without 'to'. There is no difference in meaning. "I helped him (to) carry the heavy sui...
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UNTIL and TILL
Our English Club 18 January 2020
UNTIL and TILL both mean up to the time of (a certain time or event) or not before (a certain time or event). Both are interchangeably used ...
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NATURAL ENGLISH - RATHER
✅ A: As an adverb of degree.  It is like saying "quite" and is much more common in British English... which is better in my opinio...
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MODAL VERBS AND THEIR SUBSTITUTES, part 1 OUGHT TO
Meaning the same as its cousin "should", "ought to" is probably the least popular modal verb in the classroom. Teachers ...
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Should we write "Please send me your comments" or "Please, send me your comments"?
Should we write "Please send me your comments" or "Please, send me your comments"? For many users the version without a ...
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